DIRECTOR’S NOTE - Jonathan Sanger

Although we may describe this play as taking place in the future, it is a near future we are speaking of. The world has not changed so much technologically that we wouldn’t recognize it. And our human feelings are much as they are today. But we are dealing with a social reality in which famine and disease are eliminated as well as poverty as we know it. The stasis of life is handled by the state and the continuation of life on an individual level is up to each individual, just like the management of one’s bank account today is up to each of us. Thus, some of us are frugal and save, and others can’t seem to keep their bankbooks in balance.

The one key difference in this world is that anything that has no use cannot afford to be kept, including people.

In this world of no homelessness or crime, there is also no disease. The only pills taken by anyone would be to end a life. And the worst offense in society is to remember the past prior to the institution of the new world order.

Old memories can only lead to dissatisfaction and can create tension that is not productive to a functioning society. As such, all past images, photos, and keepsakes are forbidden. Paintings and other images that refer to a past time are also not allowed.

As soon as the last elder who was born prior to the new times has died, all artifacts of that person must also be destroyed... so that the dishes from Felix’s mother are only allowed to be kept as long as the eldest family member, Teresa, is alive.

‘Video specs’, ‘e-letts’, ‘streaming’, etc. are all terms used for public and personal communication. And the walls really do have ears; they also have emotions and can change color depending on the temperament of the conversations within.

A government big enough to give you everything you want, is a government big enough to take away everything you have.